Summer Reading/Viewing List

Here is a summer reading/viewing list of books and documentaries relating to my internship at Creative Commons and to my ongoing personal interests.  It’s a self-assigned curriculum for summer self-improvement if you will.  The general themes include technology, the internet, copyright, culture, creativity, and food.  I haven’t actually read all the books yet, but I have seen all the movies.

At the time of writing, all of the works are available for free (legal) viewing or download online except for Food Inc., which is now in theaters around the US – and a must see for EVERY American.  I know I have kind of geeky interests, and not everybody cares to read 300+ page books about copyright, but everybody eats, so go see Food Inc already!

Books

The Wealth of Networks
How Social Production Transforms Markets and Freedom
Yochai Benkler

Code and Other Laws of Cyberspace 2.0
Lawrence Lessig

Free Culture
How Big Media Uses Technology and the Law to Lock Down Culture and Control Creativity
Lawrence Lessig

Remix
Making art and commerce thrive in the hybrid economy
Lawrence Lessig

The Pirates Dilemma
How Youth Culture Is Reinventing Capitalism
Matt Mason

The Public Domain
Enclosing the Commons of the Mind
James Boyle

Viral Spiral
How the Commoners Built a Digital Republic of Their Own
David Bollier

The Future of the Internet And How to Stop It
Jonathan Zittrain

Music and It’s Reflection on Society
Catalan: La Música i el seu reflex en la societat
Spanish: La música y su reflejo en la sociedad
Edited by Indigestió
A collection of essays about the role of music in contemporary society. Only in Spanish and Catalan for now though.

Tales from the Public Domain: Bound By Law?
“Bound by Law translates law into plain English and abstract ideas into ‘visual metaphors.’ So the comic’s heroine, Akiko, brandishes a laser gun as she fends off a cyclopean ‘Rights Monster’ – all the while learning copyright law basics, including the line between fair use and copyright infringement.” -Brandt Goldstein, The Wall Street Journal online

Documentaries

Good Copy/Bad Copy
A Danish documentary about the current state of copyright and culture

Rip: A Remix Manifesto
A Canadian documentary film about copyright and remix culture.

The Future of Food
An in-depth look into the controversy over genetically modified foods.  Watch it online at Snagfilms.

Food, Inc.
Filmmaker Robert Kenner lifts the veil on our nation’s food industry, exposing the highly mechanized underbelly that has been hidden from the American consumer with the consent of our government’s regulatory agencies, USDA and FDA.

The Legend of Leigh Bowery
The Legend of Leigh Bowery explores a life lived as if it was a performance. Leigh Bowery was a costume/clothing designer, nightclub impresario, performer, and musician whose vision influenced many of today’s most important artists. He later became known to the world at large as the muse and subject of preeminent British painter Lucian Freud.

ccSalon San Francisco June 2009

Salon-sf

The Creative Commons Salon San Francisco took place on June 24th at PariSoMa, “a coworking space that provides desks, wi-fi, coffee and community to independent professionals.”  The theme of the salon was “[t]he digital intersection of art, history, and culture, and how CC can play a defining role in enriching all three.”  Videos after the jump.

Continue reading ccSalon San Francisco June 2009

Open Educational Resources for JET/ESL

This is an update on my internship with ccLearn, a division of Creative Commons,  a non-profit organization dedicated to realizing the full potential of the internet to support open learning and open educational resources. Our mission is to minimize legal, technical, and social barriers to sharing and reuse of educational materials.

We are working on a site called OpenEd, a site for the Open Education Community and are looking for input and participation from past and present JET Programme participants (I’m a JET alum and webmaster of the JET Alumni Association of NY) as well as other members of the ESL teaching community.

The JET community already has a history of sharing lesson plans and ideas. On a more global level, educators and and institutions have being contributing content (lesson plans, worksheets, multimedia, etc.) to the pool of Open Educational Resources (OER), a kind of educational commons that fosters collaboration and yields greater flexibility and creativity in education.

OER are openly licensed educational resources for teachers and students. All materials that are licensed with a Creative Commons license are OER. OER are “some rights reserved”, meaning that you are free to use a CC licensed work without asking permission as long as you adhere to the license terms. Depending on the license used, you can access, share (copy, distribute, display), adapt (perform, translate), or derive (modify, remix) OER. The openness of a resource increases with the uses allowed.

The OpenEd site is a wiki, so like Wikipedia, anybody can edit the site.  We welcome members of the JET community to add to and edit the site.  We would love to see more links to educational resources as well as personal stories about how you have used open educational resources.

We invite you to take a look at the JET Community page on OpenEd.  You can set up an account on Open Ed and edit and add content.

Doing the Google

The summer interns from Creative Commons and the Electronic Frontier Foundation were invited to Google headquarters in Mountain View today for a brief tour of the campus and lunch at one of the company’s legendary cafeterias.  Here is my photo essay of the excursion:

creative commons interns do the google
Creative Commons interns do the Google. Continue reading Doing the Google

Creative Commons Internship Self-Intro

The summer interns at Creative Commons gave their self introduction presentations to the CC staff today.  I gave a brief 5-minute overview of my life, education and work.  This post is more for self-archiving and documentation purposes, but if you want to see my slides, they are here:

Download ZIP of my self-introduction Keynote presentation.
Download PDF of my presentation (no multimedia).