Impacto 2014

Update (19 January 2015): Here is a direct video embed of my talk at the Impacto 2014 conference.

This Monday I had the honor of speaking at the Impacto 2014: Future of Business conference at Itaú Cultural in São Paulo, a free public event sponsored by Google and Itaú with assistance from Itaú Cultural and the Telefônica Brasil Foundation. I talked about the importance of historical and community-centered perspective in the process of creative problem-solving process. I then gave concrete examples through some of the current projects we are working on at Foossa and Purpose, including Wisdom Hackers, Happy Mango, and Catalyst.

My talk begins at around 3h19m (it’s all in English after a brief intro in Portuguese). Click here to view on YouTube at the exact start time.

Branding, Breeding and Your Business

Whether you want the best beef for your burger, or you want to be the best in your business, both branding and the breeding matter.

The brand, what they literally burn onto the side of the cow, identifies the rancher who raised the cattle. The breed is the cow’s DNA, it’s identity and the code for its potential growth, and ultimately, it’s tastiness on your plate.

The breed is the “nature,” while the brand is the “nurture.” The brand/nurture bit helps us identify and understand how the rancher has fed and cared for the cow, because even cows with the best “breeding” may not taste so good if raised in less than ideal conditions. However, you definitely can’t hide a bad breed with all the good branding in the world. Quality starts from the inside out. It’s a matter of identity.

How does “brand” and “breed” apply to your business?

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Originally published on foossa.com. Inspired by the Amish Futurist.

The Washington Post versus Gawker

Background story in a nutshell

  1. Washington Post writer Ian Shapira writes an article about business coach/’generational consultant’ Anne Loehr: Speaking to Generation Nexus: Guru Explains Gens X, Y, Boomer To One Another
  2. Gawker blogger Hamilton Nolan picks up the story: ‘Generational Consultant’ Holds America’s Fakest Job
  3. Shapira complains that Gawker stole his story: The Death of Journalism (Gawker Edition)

My take

Shapira’s claim that Gawker did not properly attribute him are unfounded.  The Gawker post links to the original article and to Loeher’s generational cheat sheet.  Hyperlinks are the footnotes and citations of our generation (as Loeher would probably say). I’m giving my advice for free: my generation thinks that generational business coaches are B$.  We live in a cut and paste culture; computers lower the barrier to making derivative works, as the next section of this post will demonstrate.  The subject of the original article was pretty ridiculous to begin with, as if it were tailor-made for Gawker fodder.  Gawker added value to the original with its snarky commentary. (Ms. Loeher, is snark a characteristic of my generation too?)

If Oscar Wilde were alive today, he would probably say, “the only thing worse than being blogged about is NOT being blogged about.”  While we are on aphorisms, let me give you some more free (useless) advice about my generation, courtesy of Descartes, updated for our times: Blogito ergo sum. “I blog, therefore I am.”

I don’t think Gawker is so much ruining journalism as Shapira claims as much as it is Maybe the WaPo should stick to actual news coverage and investigative reporting (after all, this is the newspaper that exposed the Watergate scandal, but “old media” can’t just rest on its past laurels).  “New media” like Gizmodo is going to give newspapers a run for their money in terms of business model.  Newspapers can either adapt their business models and learn to compete with the supposed “pirates” (“piracy is just another business model“), or they can fail.  They can revamp their content and delivery models, or they can streamline and specialize in what they do best.  But here’s a hint for being hip with the kids: complaining about the death of journalism is old news and kind of played out.

Or, in a move of desperation, they can throw down the gauntlet and start an Internet turf war like Shapira has done, which is actually a very Gawker-esque thing to do.  (What would Anne Loeher say about how that reflects on Shapira’s generational values?) It certainly has succeeded in getting people’s attention, but I hope this is not the sustainable business model the WaPo has in mind.

Continue reading The Washington Post versus Gawker

How Trent Reznor & NIN Represent the Future of the Music Biz

Video of Mike Masnick’s keynote presentation at the Leadership Music Digital Summit (25 March 09):

Masnick talks about how “free music” business models can allow musicians to connect with fans and give them reasons to pay the band in other ways. Using NIN as a case study, Masnick also gives examples of how “free” models have worked for less-established artists. Note the mention of Creative Commons around 6:45.

Also be sure to check out Trent Reznor’s thoughts on what to do as a new/unknown artist on the NIN forums. (Thanks to Parker for the link.)