Coconut Spice Mochi Brownies

Enjoy this mash-up of brownies, gingerbread, and Hawaiian butter mochi. This is a super simple holiday dessert recipe that packs a ton of tropical flavor.

Recipe:
1. Preheat oven to 350 F / 180 C.

2. Mix wet ingredients in a bowl:
* 6 eggs (beaten)
* 2 teaspoons of vanilla extract
* 1 can (400 ml) of coconut milk
* 400 ml of cow’s milk (use the can of coconut milk to measure)
* 1 stick of butter (melted)

3. In another big bowl, mix the dry ingredients:
* 2 cups of mochiko (glutinous or “sweet” rice flour)
* 1 cup of unsweetened dry shredded coconut
* 1 cup of unsweetened cocoa powder
* 1.5 cups of coconut (or brown) sugar
* 1 teaspoon of baking powder
* 1/4 teaspoon of salt.
* Optional: since this is the holiday season, I kicked things up by adding1/4 teaspoon of each of the following dried powdered spices: cinnamon, cardamom, black pepper, nutmeg, ginger. If you really want to live on the edge, you can put some cayenne pepper in this too.

4. Pour the wet ingredients into the bowl with the dry ingredients. Mix well and pour into a 9 x 13 inch (33 x 23 cm) baking tray. Bake for 1 hour. Enjoy!

These brownies are great by themselves or warm with some ice cream, or you can always reheat them in the microwave or a toaster oven to serve later. If you want a drink pairing, port wine works well. Or a not-too-smoky whisky.

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VIDEO: Design Challenges at the Rwandan Genocide Memorial

How do we design transformative museum experiences that bridge the gap between empathy and action?

I explore this¬†question in my¬†Rising Minds talk at Soho House NY and share about Foossa’s design collaboration with UX for Good and the Kigali Genocide Memorial.

Rising Minds presents Lee-Sean Huang, Co-founder and Creative Director of Foossa from risingminds on Vimeo.

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6 Essential Skills for Design & Social Innovation

Students and job seekers frequently ask me about the skills that they need to succeed at Foossa, the community-centered design and strategy consultancy that I cofounded, or in a related career path. I came up with this list as a starting point for anyone interested in using design as a tool for social innovation.

1. Write Well

Being a strong writer goes a long way. Clear writing signals that you can think clearly and communicate effectively.

Craft compelling stories. Appeal to the heart and to the head. Be persuasive. Be concise. Be memorable. 

2. Prototype 

Prototyping could mean making something out of popsicle sticks and pipe cleaners to coding the minimum viable version of an¬†app. You¬†don’t necessary need high tech¬†prototyping skills, but you do have a bias toward action.

You learn by doing. You learn by making. You prototype to learn. You can think visually and sketch out maps, diagrams, and charts to help inform your thinking. Your sketches could be doodles on Post-Its rather than museum-worthy masterpieces, although strong drawing skills are certainly a plus.

3. Code Switch

You speak the language of business. You speak the language of your clients and of your customers. You speak the language of social innovation. You understand how to define a theory of change.

You know how to reinterpret a creative brief to get down to the essence of what the needs really are.

You can get by in the language of designers and technologists enough to be able to collaborate with them effectively and to manage multi-disciplinary teams. You understand the basics of visual language, from hierarchy to typography. Bonus points if you can code in a programming language.

4. Make Stuff Happen

You know how to manage projects from inspiration to implementation. You break down difficult and complex tasks into manageable steps. You find the courage to put stuff out in the world to see what happens. You iterate until you get it right. Then you iterate some more.

You make community happen. Bring people together and get them involved in collaboration and co-creation. This could mean hosting an event, facilitating  a meeting/workshop, or community-managing an online discussion forum. 

5. Give and Receive Feedback

You know how to conduct a design critique. Help your teammates improve by giving critical insights and new perspectives into their work. You can give and get feedback without making it personal.

You make it about the creative brief and shared goals rather than just your personal opinions and preferences.

You learn how to filter the feedback that you get into “advice to implement” and “advice¬†to take with a grain of salt.”

6. Document, Document, Document

My professors¬†really drove this point home in my masters program. Make sure you document your work, whether it is through blogging, journaling, photos, videos, or a combination of the above. You will need it one day in the future, whether it is for a portfolio or for another project. Pictures, or it didn’t really happen.

This list is a work in progress. What skills would you add? Let me know in the comments.

P.S. If you are considering grad school to help you acquire some of theses skills, check out the MFA Design for Social Innovation program at the School of Visual Arts in New York City. I teach there.