Masters of Networks 3 in Review

As part of our work with Purpose and the CATALYST consortium, I have spent the last couple of days in Rome, Italy at the Masters of Networks 3 hackathon.

Masters of Networks 3 is a two-day hackathon for network scientists, active members of online communities and people interested in participatory democracy to get together, discuss, and make sense of what we know about online communities.

Here are two Medium posts that I wrote documenting the event. You can also check out #MoN3 on Twitter to see tweets related to the hackathon.

Benjamin Renoust did a data analysis and visualization of the activity around the #LOTE4 hashtag on Twitter. He found a “community” of 8000 accounts who tweeted and/or retweeted the hashtag. He then drilled down to find a core group of 18 Twitter accounts who were actively engaged in sustained conversations with each other (replies & counter-replies). Read the team documentation notes here.

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#FoossaFinds – 22 October 2014

The Thinking Body

Did you know that Einstein’s insights for the theory of relativity came to him in the form of kinesthetic sensations in his muscles?

In a Wisdom Hackers ebook published this week, Foossa’s Lee-Sean Huang explores issues of embodied cognition and “the thinking body.” You can read a free excerpt of the ebook on Medium, and subscribe to the full series on The Pigeonhole. We also welcome you to join us in discussing these ideas on DebateHub.

Articles

@leesean – A Fitness Tracker for Online Communities? Collective Intelligence Meets Wisdom Hackers

@TechReview – Isaac Asimov Mulls “How Do People Get New Ideas?”

Event

Join Purpose and the #GivingTuesday team for a panel on how to maximize donations to your organization
Wednesday, 29 October 2014
Purpose, 115 Fifth Avenue, 6th Floor (Bet. 18th & 19th St.) New York NY 10003
FREE with RSVP

#SpiritAnimals

@Dodo/@Melissa_Cronin – Triple Rescue: Baby Ostriches Comfort Baby Elephant As He’s Airlifted
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@leesean – Happy Autumn Survivalist Squirrel
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Reposted from Foossa.com

CATALYST: Meet the Team

A fitness tracker for online communities and conversations? What is CATALYST all about? Meet the team and discover why we are so passionate about it!

Online communities have been playing an increasingly important role in supporting grassroots initiatives in the area of social innovation and sustainability. However, as such platforms go larger and larger, it is more and more difficult for community managers to ensure efficient debates among citizens, i.e. to ensure collective ideation, decision and action.

Major community networks and leading research institutes have teamed up to tackle this issue with the support of the European Commission’s research funding programme. Over 2 years, through the CATALYST project, they will develop and test collective intelligence tools and make them available, as open source solutions, to any interested communities.

Use cases planned in the short term should demonstrate how CATALYST developments can boost local initiatives in the area of social innovation, increase awareness on new sustainable lifestyles, support eGovernance efforts of European cities and even empower citizens and the civil society in debating emerging issues for the new European Constitution.

Help us test CATALYST

We have partnered with the Wisdom Hackers community to test DebateHub, part of the CATALYST suite of open source tools. Join us in a collective ideation, discussion, and debate of ways to maintain the festival spirit, how to think outside the cubicle and activate the thinking body, and much more.

Music credit for CATALYST video: “Daybreak” by Baja Snake/HEPNOVA

Imagine the future of organised civil society and help design the future of online debate

On 23rd June, Euclid Network and Purpose will be launching the first online discussion on the future of civil society, and we would like you to take part. The subject for this initial debate will be:

“How could civil society organisations attract more people to work and volunteer with them?”

At this stage, all we ask you to do is to click here to let us know you want to take part in the debate, and we will then contact you on Monday 23rd with a link to your debate.

The aim behind these debates is not only to gather a wide range of views on organised civil society, but to also test how new online deliberation technologies can support more robust debates and discussions than traditional platforms. In particular you will be involved in the testing of DebateHub, an innovative online debating tool developed by the Open University, which uses the Internet to harness collective intelligence.

As the tool is still in the testing stage we will be splitting participants into different testing groups, and we will present different groups with different user interfaces for online discussion. For this reason you may know someone else who is participating, but you might not be involved in the same debate group, and may not use the same debate tool.

Regardless of which test group you are in, all contributions to the debates will contribute to a unique collective picture and will be synthesized and incorporated into a report on “Imagining the Future of Civil Society”, to be published by Euclid, Purpose and the Open University. All contributors to the debates will be recognised as co-authors of the report.

In summary as a participant:

  • you will be contributing to the debate of important Civil Society issues,
  • you will help the research and development of innovative technologies for public deliberation,
  • you will be listed as co-author of a publicly available report on “Imagining the Future of Civil Society”.

We look forward to hearing from you, and please do not hesitate to contact us with any questions you may have.

Thanks and kind regards,

Stephen J Barnett, Euclid Network
Lee-Sean Huang, Purpose
Anna De Liddo, The Open University

The Power of a Brand to Transform A City

Meu Rio Members

From my latest article in GOOD:

How can we use the power of branding to strengthen a shared identity and spark positive change in the neighborhoods and cities where we live? An effective visual identity references the culture and history of a place’s people and reflects their hopes and aspirations. Logos, fonts, or color schemes, the most tangible parts of a brand identity, are not magical cure-alls for the financial, social, and cultural ills of a city, but they can be powerful symbols and rallying cries that galvanize people to action. Here are some stories and insights on how you can create a brand identity for change in your community:

Read more on GOOD.is