Free the film, Free dolphins

Today, I went to see The Cove, a documentary centering around the annual dolphin slaughter in Taiji, Japan.  As some reviewers have already said, the movie marries spy-thriller suspense with compelling investigative storytelling.  Because of the Japanese government and whaling interests not wanting the story to get out, the filmmakers had to secretly (and perhaps illegally) document the dolphin slaughter; in my opinion, a heroic act of civil disobedience.  As I learned on the  JET Programme, in Japan it is perhaps easier to ask for forgiveness than to ask for permission.  BTW, fellow ITP geeks will love the filmmakers use of hidden cameras designed by Industrial Light and Magic to blend in with the rocks and foliage around the Cove.

I am taking a pledge suggested by the film and now refraining from visiting aquariums and aquatic mammal shows.  I will also be sure to buy dolphin-safe seafood.  Here are some main points of the film: Continue reading Free the film, Free dolphins

Frenchie Friday

I went see Julie & Julia last night with Michelle.  I hope Meryl Streep wins an Oscar for her amazing performance as Julia Child.  The Julie Powell character was a bit annoying at times though, and her story line wasn’t nearly as interesting as Julia’s.  They could have probably made an entire movie based on Julia Child’s life alone.  Nevertheless, I recommend the film.

Julie_and_julia

The cringe-worthy Cobb salad scene where Julie Powell has lunch with her friends made me strangely homesick for NY.  The depiction of Julie’s shamelessly ambitious, cell phone-tethered friends was pretty-right on.  They represent all that is terrible yet strangely charming about NYC (or maybe it’s just because I’ve been away for the too long).

Watching all that French food being made and eaten on the big screen piqued our appetite, so I busted out the iPhone and found Le Charm French Bistro in SoMa.  The restaurant is a charming, old-school French bistro, with a very reasonably-priced $30 three-course dinner prix fixe.  I had the French onion soup, a seafood bourride, and the strawberry tart for dessert.  Yum!

One more week to go for my ccLearn internship.  The rest of the ccLearn crew will be in Vancouver next week for the Open Education Conference, while I will be sticking around SF wrapping things up and documenting my work.  Then back to NYC next Friday.

Summer Reading/Viewing List

Here is a summer reading/viewing list of books and documentaries relating to my internship at Creative Commons and to my ongoing personal interests.  It’s a self-assigned curriculum for summer self-improvement if you will.  The general themes include technology, the internet, copyright, culture, creativity, and food.  I haven’t actually read all the books yet, but I have seen all the movies.

At the time of writing, all of the works are available for free (legal) viewing or download online except for Food Inc., which is now in theaters around the US – and a must see for EVERY American.  I know I have kind of geeky interests, and not everybody cares to read 300+ page books about copyright, but everybody eats, so go see Food Inc already!

Books

The Wealth of Networks
How Social Production Transforms Markets and Freedom
Yochai Benkler

Code and Other Laws of Cyberspace 2.0
Lawrence Lessig

Free Culture
How Big Media Uses Technology and the Law to Lock Down Culture and Control Creativity
Lawrence Lessig

Remix
Making art and commerce thrive in the hybrid economy
Lawrence Lessig

The Pirates Dilemma
How Youth Culture Is Reinventing Capitalism
Matt Mason

The Public Domain
Enclosing the Commons of the Mind
James Boyle

Viral Spiral
How the Commoners Built a Digital Republic of Their Own
David Bollier

The Future of the Internet And How to Stop It
Jonathan Zittrain

Music and It’s Reflection on Society
Catalan: La Música i el seu reflex en la societat
Spanish: La música y su reflejo en la sociedad
Edited by Indigestió
A collection of essays about the role of music in contemporary society. Only in Spanish and Catalan for now though.

Tales from the Public Domain: Bound By Law?
“Bound by Law translates law into plain English and abstract ideas into ‘visual metaphors.’ So the comic’s heroine, Akiko, brandishes a laser gun as she fends off a cyclopean ‘Rights Monster’ – all the while learning copyright law basics, including the line between fair use and copyright infringement.” -Brandt Goldstein, The Wall Street Journal online

Documentaries

Good Copy/Bad Copy
A Danish documentary about the current state of copyright and culture

Rip: A Remix Manifesto
A Canadian documentary film about copyright and remix culture.

The Future of Food
An in-depth look into the controversy over genetically modified foods.  Watch it online at Snagfilms.

Food, Inc.
Filmmaker Robert Kenner lifts the veil on our nation’s food industry, exposing the highly mechanized underbelly that has been hidden from the American consumer with the consent of our government’s regulatory agencies, USDA and FDA.

The Legend of Leigh Bowery
The Legend of Leigh Bowery explores a life lived as if it was a performance. Leigh Bowery was a costume/clothing designer, nightclub impresario, performer, and musician whose vision influenced many of today’s most important artists. He later became known to the world at large as the muse and subject of preeminent British painter Lucian Freud.

28 Minutes Later

What happens when 100 people have 28 minutes to make a movie? Here’s a pretty good answer:

We shot the video and audio for this movie in Red Burn’s Applications class on Tuesday. We really only had 28 minutes to record! I played the voice on the phone telling Mario that he has gonorrhea.

Thanks to Alex Kauffmann, Adam Lassy, Si Youn, JeeHyun Moon, Jonathan Nachum, Nathan Roth, Caroline Brown, and Brian Carey Chung for organizing everything.

Protest Against the Bush Bailout on Wall Street

My audio slideshow of the protest on Wall Street on September 25, 2008.


Protest Against the Bush Bailout on Wall Street from lee-sean on Vimeo.

Also on YouTube and Blip.tv. Photos on Flickr.