leeseanhuang_impacto2014

Impacto 2014

This Monday I had the honor of speaking at the Impacto 2014: Future of Business conference at Itaú Cultural in São Paulo, a free public event sponsored by Google and Itaú with assistance from Itaú Cultural and the Telefônica Brasil Foundation. I talked about the importance of historical and community-centered perspective in the process of creative problem-solving process. I then gave concrete examples through some of the current projects we are working on at Foossa and Purpose, including Wisdom Hackers, Happy Mango, and Catalyst.

My talk begins at around 3h19m (it’s all in English after a brief intro in Portuguese). Click here to view on YouTube at the exact start time.

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Spanish-Japanese Eggs

Today for brunch, I created a mash-up of two of my favorite egg dishes: Spanish tortilla, a thick omelet with potatoes, and Japanese tamagoyaki, a rolled omelet infused with a slightly sweet soy and dashi broth.

In place of regular potatoes, I use satsumaimo, a kind of Japanese sweet potato that is whiter and a bit firmer than American sweet potatoes. Of course, you can use whatever sweet potato you can find. I pre-cook the satsumaimo with a kind of delicate simmering technique called nimono before incorporating it into the omelet.

The recipe takes a bit of time to make from scratch, but the techniques are simple. I think it’s worth the effort and the perfect way to impress your family and friends with a fresh take on the usual weekend brunch fare.

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INGREDIENTS

  • 1 piece of kombu
  • 3 thin slices of fresh ginger
  • 4-5 dried shiitake (mushrooms)
  • 1 handful of katsuobushi (dried bonito flakes)
  • 1 satsumaimo (Japanese sweet potato), substitute the American kind if you can’t find the Japanese kind
  • 1 clove of garlic, thinly sliced
  • sesame oil
  • 8 medium organic eggs
  • 1 scallion, thinly sliced
  • yuzukoshō (a kind of Japanese fermented green chili and citrus peel paste)
  • soy sauce
  • mirin (sweet rice wine) and sake
  • extra virgin olive oil
  • sesame seeds
  • red chili flakes/cayenne pepper
  • pimentón (Spanish smoked paprika)
  • brown sugar, salt and pepper

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1. Make Broth

  • Rinse the shiitake, kombu, and ginger and place in a medium saucepan with about a liter of cold water.
  • Bring to a simmer, and cook gently for 30 minutes, uncovered.
  • Pick out the kombu and mushrooms and reserve. Leave in the ginger.
  • Bring to a boil and toss in the katsuobushi. Turn off heat, let cool for 10 minutes and strain. Discard katsuobushi and ginger.
  • Add 2 tablespoons of soy sauce and sugar, 1 tablespoon each of mirin and sake. Add salt to taste. It should be salty and a bit sweet but not too overwhelming.

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2. Prepare Satsumaimo

  • While the broth is simmering, cut the satsumaimo into 1/4 inch-thick half moons. Leave the skin on, but trim off any dried-out or dark bits.
  • Soak the satsumaimo slices in cold water until ready to use. This removes some of the extra starch and prevents oxidation, which turns the sweet potato brown.
  • Drain the satsumaimo slices from the cold water and simmer in the broth from the previous step for 15-20 minutes until soft but not falling apart. Remove satsumaimo from cooking liquid, reserving some of the broth.

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3. Make Topping

  • While the satsumaimo is simmering in the broth, prepare the crunchy mushroom and kombu topping.
  • Thinly slice the kombu and shiitake reserved from the broth making.
  • Heat about a teaspoon of the sesame oil in a small saucepan. Add in the sliced kombu and shiitake along with the sliced garlic.
  • Season with a few pinches of red chili powder and/or cayenne, freshly grated black pepper and sugar. Add a small splash each of sake, mirin, and soy sauce.
  • Cook until liquid is absorbed and mixture looks dark and crunchy. Sprinkle on white sesame seeds.

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4. Final Assembly

  • Whisk 1/4 teaspoon of yuzukoshō and the scallion in about 1/4 cup of the reserved simmering liquid. Beat in the eggs.
  • Heat a well-seasoned cast iron pan on a medium flame and coat with a thin layer of olive oil. Add the egg mixture, then add a layer of the satsumaimo slices. I had some extra sweet potato that I saved for another use. Then add the kombu and mushroom mixture on top.
  • Continue cooking on low heat until edges look slightly solid. Finish in the broiler (1-2 minutes). The eggs should still be a little runny in the center. Drizzle with olive oil, sprinkle with pimentón, and serve. Enjoy!

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#GivingTuesday, New York Social Good Holiday Bash, & Catalyst User Survey

There’s #BlackFriday, #CyberMonday, and now #GivingTuesday, a movement to create a global day of giving on Tuesday, December 2. Hundreds of organizations have raised over $6,000,000 on Indiegogo in preparations for #GivingTuesday and on their way to raise millions more with your support.

We invite you to this interactive celebration to listen, experience, and share in these organizations’ impact stories this #GivingTuesday. Learn about great causes that are changing lives worldwide this holiday season. Vote on the 15 organizations that will pitch live during the event to win $5,000 (Voting begins at midnight on December 2 here). Enjoy holiday hors d’eouvres and spirits along with tunes by DJ Phi Unit

*** 100% of ticket sales will go towards charity, as part of the prize money for the winning pitch.

Join us on December 11th for the New York Social Good Holiday Bash!

We’re excited to be partnering with Be Social Change to ring in the holidays and build stronger connective tissue among the people and organizations driving social innovation in NYC! On December 11th at 6:30 PM, join us at Wix Lounge to for New York Social Good Holiday Bash! In the great company of our fellow purpose-driven New Yorkers, we’ll be enjoying tasty snacks, drinks, and festivities.

You can purchase your ticket here: bit.ly/NYSGbash. For a 25% discount, use the promo code “NYSGholiday” at checkout.

Save the date, invite your friends, and celebrate collective impact, new connections and collaborations with the New York Social Good community!

See you on December 11th!

Help us test CATALYST tools today: join the debates and tell us more about your experience with DebateHub

The CATALYST Consortium has begun alpha testing of the DebateHub, a collective intelligence platform for group ideation, discussion, and debate. DebateHub also includes cutting edge tools to help community managers (visualize and understand the social dynamics and argument balance of a given debate or deliberation.

Purpose and the Open University’s Knowledge Media Institute have partnered with a several communities who have begun experimenting with DebateHub. These communities include Wisdom Hackers, a group of artists, activists, and entrepreneurs building an “incubator” for philosophy and wisdom into the discourse of contemporary living, as well as the alumni association of the Interactive Telecommunications Program (ITP) at New York University. Catalyst consortium partner Purpose is also using DebateHub as a transparent and inclusive place to plan its spring campaign and upcoming testbed, in which the organization plans to use DebateHub as a platform for hosting a large scale public discussion about imagining the future of European identity.

We need your help to improve DebateHub. Please give DebateHub a try and give us your feedback by filling out the short survey, which takes approximately 5 minutes to complete. Thanks in advance for your help. We look forward to your input in our iterative design process and product development.

Learning to Listen

It sounds elementary, but even us grown-ups need an occasional refresher course on how to listen, how to REALLY listen. Listening is an essential part of being a good friend, colleague, lover, designer, manager, and PERSON. It’s a prerequisite for empathy, creativity, and collaboration.

By Chloe Tseung, David Colby Reed, and Lee-Sean Huang

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